Civil homework help

For years, 28 year old Lou Sohn has been trying to make it as a musician. He has played bars from Maine to California. He has had some songs he wrote and recorded played on college radio. He was a first round contestant on American Idol, but was cut before making it to Hollywood. He is getting ready to give up the business when a friend arranges an audition for Lou with Ashley Alan Dicker, of ADD Records, a twenty year old record label that has had a few hits, but never broken into the big time.
Lou’s audition seems to go well. Ashley called Lou up a week later and gave him the good news. “Lou, baby,” Ashley said, “I think you’ve got “IT” ADD is going to make you a big star. Who are your manager and lawyer.
Lou tells Ashley he has never had a manager or lawyer before. “That’s a good thing,” says Ashley, “they just waste time and money. Trust me baby, I will be the one looking out for you.”
Lou can’t believe his good fortune. Ashley hands him a 15 page contract and says, “Just sign it baby. It is a standard contract. We advance the money for the recordings, we distribute, you get the first $5,000 gross income and then we split everything down the middle .” Ashley hands Lou a shiny gold pen. Lou hesitates. “What’s the matter baby?” Ashley asks. “Well, honestly, I am broke,” says Lou, “Is it possible to get any money up front?’
Ashley pulls out his checkbook. “I like you baby, we are going to do great things. Sign right now and I will give you a $500 advance.” That was all Lou needed to hear. He didn’t even read the contract, he just signed it on the spot.
Lou recorded his first CD for ADD, “Out of My Cave.” It got some alternative rock air play, but never caught on with Itunes. After six months, total sales were only $8,500. Lou wasn’t thrilled, but still, he could use the money. He wrote to ADD and asked for his $5,000 in first royalties plus 50% of the remaining $3,500 for a total of $6,750. ADD’s accounting department responded by sending him a bill:
INVOICE
Recording costs
Studio time $ 3,700
Engineers $ 2,700
Producer advance $ 5,000
Total Recording costs $ 11,400
Promotion costs $ 3,700
Total Costs $15,100
Less credit for sales $ 6,750
TOTAL BALANCE DUE $ 8,350
The hottest movie this summer is the block buster super hero film “The White Knight Ascends.” Lou goes to see it and is shocked to find that “Out of My Cave” is played several times in the movie. It appears ADD licensed Lou’s song to the film for $100,000. When Lou calls ADD to ask about it, he is told that all the licensing money belongs to ADD.
Lou comes to you asking for help. He brings his contract with him. By now he has tried to read it, but cannot make heads or tails of it. In looking it over, you see that some of the relevant provisions are as follows:
“17 C – Sohn agrees to pay, or to reimburse ADD, for all recording costs including, without limitation, all costs related to the use of the studio, hiring of engineers and producers, and all promotion costs.”
“41 F – Sohn grants ADD all rights to the songs written by artist and the Master recordings of such songs as are included on any recordings produced pursuant to this agreement. Without limitation, this shall include the right to license such masters and underlying songs for use in motion pictures. And Sohn hereby waives any claim to the income from such license”
What can Lou do (with your help, of course)? Analyze the strengths and weaknesses of his case.  MUST INCLUDE CASE LAW

Civil homework help

Oscar, the owner of Blackacre in fee simple absolute, conveyed Blackacre “to Anna and her heirs insofar as the premises are not used for gambling, but if gambling ever occurs on the premises then Oscar shall reenter and terminate Anna’s ownership.”
Anna built a restaurant and a banquet hall on the property 50 years ago. From the beginning of the banquet hall’s existence, each year a local high school rented the banquet hall for class reunions. At these reunions, bingo and poker games for cash prizes were part of the evening’s entertainment.
Oscar died last year. While Oscar was alive, Oscar never attempted to reclaim the property from Anna. Oscar’s will left all of Oscar’s property to a local charity. Oscar’s sole heir is Fred.
Your client wants to buy the property from Anna, tear down the restaurant and banquet hall, and build a neighborhood retail center instead. The retail center would include a convenience store that sells lottery tickets.
Advise your client concerning the risks associated with acquiring title to the property, and how your client may attempt to mitigate these risks. In advising the client, assume that the statute of limitations for a possibility of reverter or a right of entry is 20 years, and that it is unclear whether or not the jurisdiction follows the common law rules for transferability of these future interests.
2-3 pages
Include Case Law if applicable

Civil homework help

Leon Landlord owned a duplex in the state of Navasota, which follows the majority common law rules on matters of landlord and tenant law. Leon resided in one unit of the duplex and rented the other unit in the duplex to Teresa Tenant. Leon told Teresa, “you pay me $5,700 for a six month lease. Rent is $950 a month due on the first day of each month. After that, we can agree to go month-to-month.” Teresa agreed to these terms. As part of the lease arrangement, Teresa agreed to mow the lawn and water the flowers and landscaping in exchange for the $50 per month rent discount (normally Leon charged $1,000 a month for the unit). They signed the lease on May 1. Teresa paid the $950 in monthly rent on the first day of the first and second months of the lease (June 1 and July 1).
Two and one-half months after they signed the lease, on July 15th, Leon came home and found the following note taped to his front door:
Leon –
My brother Stanley is a recovering drug addict. He just got out of rehab and has no place to live. I’ve gone to California to get him and bring him here to live with me. My friend Mabel will stay at my place, pay the rent as it comes due for me, and take care of things around my place while I’m away.
Teresa
Shortly after Teresa left, a summer heat wave struck the area. Mabel paid the rent of $950 to Leon on the first day of the third month of the lease (August 1). Mabel failed, however, to water the landscaping and the flowers. When Leon asked Mabel when she would water the landscaping and the flowers, Mabel said, “That’s not my problem.” Disgusted, Leon watered the landscaping in the flowers himself. When Mabel tried to pay the monthly rent of $950 on the first day of the fourth month after the original lease began, Leon refused a check, saying, “That’s not enough. It’s $1,000 because I had to do the watering.” When Mabel refused to pay Leon $1,000, Leon turned off the water to Teresa’s unit (the controls were in Leon’s side of the duplex). Mabel complained to Leon, “You know, I can’t live here without any running water.” Leon replied, “You’ll get water when I get $1,000.” Mabel retorted, “That’s it! I am gone for good!” Mabel packed her things and left. Leon began advertising the unit as “For Rent” in the local paper.
When Teresa returned with her brother Stanley one week later, she found her unit lacked running water. Teresa confronted Leon, who told Teresa that he would restore the water only if she paid $1,000 for the monthly rent, paid an additional $1,000 as a damages deposit “for that addict brother of yours,” and paid $250 “to replace my dried up flowers and shrubs.” Teresa refused to pay, saying “That’s it, my lease just terminated.” Six months later, Leon found another tenant for Teresa’s unit, who moved in exactly nine months after Leon and Teresa’s original lease commenced.
Leon has come to you for legal advice. Leon wants to be compensated for the rent he lost prior to reletting the unit. He also wants to recover the $250 he spent to replace his damage landscaping. How much can Leon recover in damages against Teresa or Mabel? What counterclaims may be brought against Leon if he sues Teresa or Mabel?

Civil homework help

Leon Landlord owned a duplex in the state of Navasota, which follows the majority common law rules on matters of landlord and tenant law. Leon resided in one unit of the duplex and rented the other unit in the duplex to Teresa Tenant. Leon told Teresa, “you pay me $5,700 for a six month lease. Rent is $950 a month due on the first day of each month. After that, we can agree to go month-to-month.” Teresa agreed to these terms. As part of the lease arrangement, Teresa agreed to mow the lawn and water the flowers and landscaping in exchange for the $50 per month rent discount (normally Leon charged $1,000 a month for the unit). They signed the lease on May 1. Teresa paid the $950 in monthly rent on the first day of the first and second months of the lease (June 1 and July 1).
Two and one-half months after they signed the lease, on July 15th, Leon came home and found the following note taped to his front door:
Leon –
My brother Stanley is a recovering drug addict. He just got out of rehab and has no place to live. I’ve gone to California to get him and bring him here to live with me. My friend Mabel will stay at my place, pay the rent as it comes due for me, and take care of things around my place while I’m away.
Teresa
Shortly after Teresa left, a summer heat wave struck the area. Mabel paid the rent of $950 to Leon on the first day of the third month of the lease (August 1). Mabel failed, however, to water the landscaping and the flowers. When Leon asked Mabel when she would water the landscaping and the flowers, Mabel said, “That’s not my problem.” Disgusted, Leon watered the landscaping in the flowers himself. When Mabel tried to pay the monthly rent of $950 on the first day of the fourth month after the original lease began, Leon refused a check, saying, “That’s not enough. It’s $1,000 because I had to do the watering.” When Mabel refused to pay Leon $1,000, Leon turned off the water to Teresa’s unit (the controls were in Leon’s side of the duplex). Mabel complained to Leon, “You know, I can’t live here without any running water.” Leon replied, “You’ll get water when I get $1,000.” Mabel retorted, “That’s it! I am gone for good!” Mabel packed her things and left. Leon began advertising the unit as “For Rent” in the local paper.
When Teresa returned with her brother Stanley one week later, she found her unit lacked running water. Teresa confronted Leon, who told Teresa that he would restore the water only if she paid $1,000 for the monthly rent, paid an additional $1,000 as a damages deposit “for that addict brother of yours,” and paid $250 “to replace my dried up flowers and shrubs.” Teresa refused to pay, saying “That’s it, my lease just terminated.” Six months later, Leon found another tenant for Teresa’s unit, who moved in exactly nine months after Leon and Teresa’s original lease commenced.
Leon has come to you for legal advice. Leon wants to be compensated for the rent he lost prior to reletting the unit. He also wants to recover the $250 he spent to replace his damage landscaping. How much can Leon recover in damages against Teresa or Mabel? What counterclaims may be brought against Leon if he sues Teresa or Mabel?

Civil homework help

Assume that you are lucky enough to own 200 acres of land in a beautiful valley. Your land begins about half way up the hill and slopes gently down to a stream, which runs through the valley. The central portion of your land has been cleared just enough to give you a spectacular view across a meadow you own, which is filled with wildflowers, is edged by large trees, and slopes gently down to the stream. Your house is at the top part of your land, close to the one road that goes through the area.
On the other side of the highway, 100 acres of land is owned by someone who has lived in the area for years, and like the rural character of the area, but is financially tempted to subdivide the land if that becomes feasible. Your neighbor’s house is situated so that he also benefits tremendously by the view across your land to the stream.
Right now, your neighbor seems interested in making a deal with you that if you will not increase the height of your house, which would block his view of the stream, then he will not subdivide his land. Thus, the rural character of the area would be preserved – at least for a time.
As a lawyer, you realize the conditions may change, so the permanent restrictions (such as easements) would not be appropriate for either you or your neighbor. But you would like to impose some restrictions on both pieces of land so that, for the foreseeable future, the rural character of the land will be preserved.
Draw up an equitable servitude that will appropriately restrict the height of buildings to be built on your land in the future. And ALSO draft an appropriate equitable servitude for your neighbor to place on his land – limiting subdivision and constructions of additional buildings.

Civil homework help

Assume that you are lucky enough to own 200 acres of land in a beautiful valley. Your land begins about half way up the hill and slopes gently down to a stream, which runs through the valley. The central portion of your land has been cleared just enough to give you a spectacular view across a meadow you own, which is filled with wildflowers, is edged by large trees, and slopes gently down to the stream. Your house is at the top part of your land, close to the one road that goes through the area.
On the other side of the highway, 100 acres of land is owned by someone who has lived in the area for years, and like the rural character of the area, but is financially tempted to subdivide the land if that becomes feasible. Your neighbor’s house is situated so that he also benefits tremendously by the view across your land to the stream.
Right now, your neighbor seems interested in making a deal with you that if you will not increase the height of your house, which would block his view of the stream, then he will not subdivide his land. Thus, the rural character of the area would be preserved – at least for a time.
As a lawyer, you realize the conditions may change, so the permanent restrictions (such as easements) would not be appropriate for either you or your neighbor. But you would like to impose some restrictions on both pieces of land so that, for the foreseeable future, the rural character of the land will be preserved.
Draw up an equitable servitude that will appropriately restrict the height of buildings to be built on your land in the future. And ALSO draft an appropriate equitable servitude for your neighbor to place on his land – limiting subdivision and constructions of additional buildings.

Civil Engineering homework help

Draft 50 Final- Revit Drawing
FALL 2020
Draw the floor plan below in Revit. Include all doors and windows.
• Use the residential template. Fill in your name in the title block.
• Wall height are all 10’-0” tall.
• Please use some type of exterior wall when drawing.
• Exterior walls are 6”.
• Interior walls are standard 2 x 4 construction with ½” drywall on each side.
• Draw walls, doors and windows only. Toilets, sinks, cabinets are not required.
• Extra points if you draw a roof plan and I can see it when I use the 3D icon.
• You may select the sizes for the windows and doors.
You can consult your book for tips on how to draw the plan.
You will be graded on selection of correct walls and completeness.
Submit the Revit file once it is completed.
I HAVE EXTENDED THE TIME FOR YOU TO COMPLETE THIS PROJECT.
DRAWING MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 11:59 ON THURSDAY, DEC 17, 2020.

Civil Engineering homework help

 
Describe the major qualities (i.e., projection family it belongs to, projection properties, projection surface
based on, projection parameters, aspect, central meridian/parallel, main purpose, etc.) of two of the
following projections, and then provide examples of other projections that have similar qualities.
1. Azimuthal Equidistant Projection
2. Mercator Projection
3. Sinusoidal Projection
4. Goode’s Interrupted Homolosine Projection
5. Robinson Projection
6. Winkel Tripel

Civil Engineering homework help

 
Describe the major qualities (i.e., projection family it belongs to, projection properties, projection surface
based on, projection parameters, aspect, central meridian/parallel, main purpose, etc.) of two of the
following projections, and then provide examples of other projections that have similar qualities.
1. Azimuthal Equidistant Projection
2. Mercator Projection
3. Sinusoidal Projection
4. Goode’s Interrupted Homolosine Projection
5. Robinson Projection
6. Winkel Tripel